Saturday, June 9, 2007

Polysyndeton

17 comments:

lswolter said...

“Laughter blew across the moon-colored lawn from the house of Clarisse and her father and mother and the uncle who smiled so quietly and so earnestly. Above all, their laughter was relaxed and hearty and not forced in any way…” (Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451, page 17)

lswolter said...

“And if it was not the three walls soon to be four walls and the dream complete, then it was the open car and Mildred driving a hundred miles an hour across town, he shouting at her and she shouting back and both trying to hear what was said, but hearing only the scream of the car.” (Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451, page 46)

lswolter said...

“Now I see your wife and your face and our fellowship…Why do they never tell us that you are poor devils like us, that your mothers are just as anxious as ours, and that we have the same fear of death, and the same dying and the same agony…” (Erich Maria Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front, page 223)

Anessa Tunprasert said...

And Clare will look at me, and I will wave to her, and she will walk back to her house with her dad, and she will wave back, slender, her night-gown blowing around her like an angel's and she will get smaller and smaller, will recede into the distance and disappear into the house, and I will stand over a small trampled bloody patch of soil and I will know; somewehre out there I am dying.
Page 451

The Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey Niffenegger

Jesse Jackson said...

They plodded along slowly, dumbly, leaning forward against the heat, unthinking, all blood and bone, simple grunts, soldiering with their legs, toiling up the hills and down into the paddies and across the rivers and up again and down, just humping, one step and then the next and then another, but no volition, no will, because it was automatic, it was anatomy, and the war was entirely a matter of posture and carriage, the hump was everything, a kind of inertia, a kind of emptiness, a dullness of desire and intellect and conscience and hope and human sensibility.

The Things They Carried, Tim O'Brien, page 15

Ryan Leikness said...

"I'm not talking about the whole universe," cut in Hatsue. "I'm talking about people-the sheriff, that prosecutor, the judge, you. People who can do things because they run newspapers or arrest people or convict them or decide about their lives."
-Pg. 326
Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson

Eric Harrison said...

"So I turned round and I found an old plastic sack covered in mud that used to have feritilizer in it and I squeezed myself and Toby's cage and my special food box into the corner between the wall of the shed and the fence and the rainwater tub and I covered myself with the fertilzer sack."

Mark Haddon, Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime, Pg. 127

Hoan Nguyen said...

"WEATHER HAD a lot to do with the life of a black slave, whether the sun was beating down hotly over his head,whether it rained, whether it was dry and dusty, or whether the winter wind came out of the northeast, bitter and cold, and bringing chills and fevers and lingering coughs. There... but in winter there were constant coughs and sneezes, chills and fevers, sometimes deadly pneumonia...while Marster and Big Missy were feasting and rejoicing there was misery among the suffering slaves."

[Jubilee by Margaret Walker]
Pages 58-59

Rachel Evans said...

" I just see out the window all the folks' houses and barns and dogs running in the yards."
Pg. 16
"Ellen Foster" by Kaye Ginnons

Kaitlyn L. said...

"People think a woman stops fighting when she is physically exhausted, but I was about to begin my real fight, a fight of words and lies and the brain" (pg 6)

"Lucky" By: Alice Sebold

Anonymous said...

"And the next day was sunday oh on the day I went to church and figured that woman with all the girls lined up by her had to be the new mama for me. And while everybody else was praying I looked over at my new mama to be and then up to the Lord and thanked him for sending me that dress."
page 98
Kaye Gibbon's Ellen Foster

Dallah said...

"But to learn in a single moment that both my mother and my father had died and left me, and that my sister too was lost to me forever...at once my mind felt like a broken vase that would not stand. I was lost even within the room around me." Chapter 8 p.g.103
Memoirs of a Geisha

Elizabeth Ontiveros said...

"I sit back on my heels and look at the damned thing. Really if it weren't so dreadful, i could laugh. All along i thought i had the Boleyn Inheritance of grace and beauty and charm, and it turns out that all i have inherited is this: her block. this is the Boleyn Inheritance for me. Voila: the executioner's block." (The Boleyn Inheritance 507)

Lindsey Carlisle said...

"In the hall by the elevator there's a little bench, and he sat me down and hugged me and kissed me and kissed me till I felt like a fluttering something; then he reached in his pocket and pulled out the most beautiful, precious rings in the world and put it on my finger." It Happened to Nancy edited by Beatrice Sparks page 110 and 111

Nico Gotera said...

"I'm forty-three years old, and a writer now, and even still, right here, I keep dreaming Linda alive. And Ted Lavender, too, and Kiowa, and Curt Lemon, and a slim young man I killed, and an old man sprawled beside a pigpen, and several others whose bodies I once lifted and dumped into a truck. They're all dead. But in a story, which is a kind of dreaming, the dead sometimes smile and sit up and return to the world"- pg. 225

Tim O'Brien, "The Things They Carried"

Tiffani Donaldson-3B said...

"I can go out, and the doctor has advised me as well to walk for two hours a day, and do exercises, and get as much fresh air as possible."

My Forbidden Face by Latifa-pg.90

Alison Terry Kirkpatrick said...

“Mother, I am almost fourteen and I haven’t had one minute alone except when I’m sitting on the toilet and even then Carolina tried to get in with me and I have to hold the door shut with my foot ‘cause the lock’s been broken I don’t know how long.”
–from The Chosen One by Carol Lynch Williams

“This is where I can think without a baby to pat or a sick person to tend or a worry to bother. It’s where I can plan and dream and hope.”
–from The Chosen One by Carol Lynch Williams